Category Archives: Events

Bringing back beavers 11 Mar

7:30 pm 11th March 2021

Josh Harris, a recent graduate from Cambridge now working for the Beaver Trust, will talk about beavers and how reintroducing them can restore our rivers.

Talks this term will be presented by zoom and will start at 7:30 p.m.

All members will be sent the zoom links for the talks. If the talk is recorded members will be sent a link to allow them to hear it again or if they were unable to attend, at their leisure. Membership costs only £6 (£5 if paid by standing order). See our membership page for full details of the benefits of membership and how to join.

To receive information on CNHS events, including the zoom links, without the other benefits of membership, join the email list by contacting webmaster [at] cnhs.org.uk to be added to the list. Please make sure that your spam filter (yahoo email addresses in particular) does not reject the messages.

Botanical explorations of Haiti 25 Feb

Haiti is one part of the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean. Originally a French colony it gained independence in 1804, the earliest country in Latin America to do so. Although poorly known today, the flora was one of the first in the New World to be recorded due to the efforts of Charles Plumier, a French missionary and naturalist who visited the Caribbean in the late 17th century. He produced a manuscript with illustrations of over 6000 plants and animals that he encountered.

Paul Hoxey will report on a trip he made to Haiti in January 2017 to investigate the flora and especially the xerophytic vegetation including cacti, following in the footsteps of Plumier. He will illustrate the talk with some of Plumier’s illustrations together with photographs taken during the expedition.

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Talks this term will be presented by zoom and will start at 7:30 p.m.

All members will be sent the zoom links for the talks. If the talk is recorded members will be sent a link to allow them to hear it again or if they were unable to attend, at their leisure. Membership costs only £6 (£5 if paid by standing order). See our membership page for full details of the benefits of membership and how to join.

To receive information on CNHS events, including the zoom links, without the other benefits of membership, join the email list by contacting webmaster [at] cnhs.org.uk to be added to the list. Please make sure that your spam filter (yahoo email addresses in particular) does not reject the messages.

Kings College Wildflower Meadow 18 Feb

On Thursday 18th February, the next CNHS talk will be by Dr Cicely Marshall, Research Fellow at King’s College. She will talk about the conversion of the King’s Back Lawn to a wildflower meadow, and the subsequent changes to its wildlife observed through ongoing monitoring activities.

Talks this term will be presented by zoom and will start at 7:30 p.m.

All members will be sent the zoom links for the talks. If the talk is recorded members will be sent a link to allow them to hear it again or if they were unable to attend, at their leisure. Membership costs only £6 (£5 if paid by standing order). See our membership page for full details of the benefits of membership and how to join.

To receive information on CNHS events, including the zoom links, without the other benefits of membership, join the email list by contacting webmaster [at] cnhs.org.uk to be added to the list. Please make sure that your spam filter (yahoo email addresses in particular) does not reject the messages.

Change of speaker 22 Feb

The details of the Cambridge Group of the Wildlife Trust talk on 22nd February have changed. Due to a family illness, the speaker has asked to postpone her talk on ‘Can biodiversity make children happy?’ It will take place now on 24th May 2021.

Instead Dr Ed Turner will present “Good crop, bad crop – can oil palm become more sustainable?” at 7:00 p.m. on Monday 22nd February.

Oil palm has often been in the press because of its negative impacts on biodiversity, particularly in some of the most biodiverse regions in the world. However, the crop is also important for the livelihoods of millions of people and has a much higher yield per area than other vegetable oil crops, meaning that more oil can be produced from a smaller area. Join Ed Turner to learn more about the work his group is doing to investigate ways that oil palm can be grown with lower environmental cost, and to discuss whether oil palm can reduce its negative impact on the environment.
 
Tickets for Ed’s talk are available from the Wildlife Trust website: www.wildlifebcn.org/events/2021-02-22-online-talk-good-crop-bad-crop-can-oil-palm-become-more-sustainable

How to save the Cam 9 Feb

On Tuesday 9 February 2021 at 6pm-7:30pm, Kim Wilkie, widely regarded as one of the UK’s top landscape architects, will talk about a landscape strategy for protecting a river and lead a community debate, hosted by The Friends of the River Cam, on how to protect the Cam and keep its tributaries and supporting ecosystems healthy.

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Cows at Sheep’s Green, by the Cam (photo taken by Tom Turner)

Kim is a prolific landscape architect who works on large-scale projects in the UK and internationally, in both public and private spaces. He works on a scale that is beyond the experience of most designers, for example, designing the green spaces around an entire new city in Oman, he was working with the architects and deciding where the buildings would go.

He worked with local communities to develop the Thames Landscape Strategy, Hampton to Kew, that set out to celebrate and understand the exceptional character of the Thames and create a 100 year strategic vision for the river corridor that would stand the test of time. How can we do the same thing for the Cam?

To join the event, use the link below:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/how-to-save-the-cam-tickets-137615003179

Spring programme 2021

Talks resume, online by zoom, on Thursday 4th February at 7:30 p.m.

Membership costs only £6 (£5 if paid by standing order) and all members will be sent the zoom links for the talks. See our membership page for full details of the benefits of membership and how to join.

To receive information on CNHS events, without the other benefits of membership, join the email list by contacting webmaster [at] cnhs.org.uk to be added to the list. Please make sure that your spam filter (yahoo email addresses in particular) does not reject the messages.

The first talk, on 4th February, is “Bees, bee conservation and bee roads” by Rosie Bleet

11th February: “Monitoring bats at the Cambridge University Botanic Garden” by Chantal Helm

18th February: “Kings College wildflower meadow” by Cicely Marshall

25th February: “Botanical explorations of Haiti” by Paul Hoxey

Speakers for talks in March are still being finalised.

It is currently intended that CNHS outdoor events will go ahead when they are again permitted by the Government.  When they do, advance booking will be required for all meetings to ensure that numbers are restricted to the allowed limit. The first might be the visit to Trumpington Meadows on 14th March which is part of the CNHS field studies for 2021.

NatHistFest open

This year, 2020, we had hoped to organise the 101st Annual Conversazione but instead the first ever online NatHistFest is now open for viewing!

Four local organisations and ten individuals have produced exhibits covering a wide variety of topics but mostly with a local angle. Find out about the rare hoverfly found this year, some interesting facts about seasonal plants, the floras of road verges and urban streets and what local organisations have done despite lockdown, among other things.

Unfortunately, technology does not permit any hands-on displays, nor does the event offer the usual opportunities to chat with the exhibitors but we hope you will enjoy the online exhibits.

We hope it will be possible for the 102nd Annual Conversazione to revert to the traditional format with exhibits that can be handled and exhibitors to talk to, but at the moment it is too soon to know what will be possible or when.

The online NatHistFest will remain open into 2021 and late entries can be submitted until the end of December 2020.

River Cam debate 8 December 2020

What does the River Cam mean to you?

Tuesday 8th December at 6 p.m. ONLINE

Feargal Sharkey will lead an online debate about our rivers and saving the Cam.

The Cam and its tributaries, like other chalk streams, are in a very bad way. Sucked dry by water companies and polluted by sewage. This is a Cambridge issue, but it’s a national disgrace too. Feargal Sharkey, the former punk musician, businessman and now trout fisherman has led a remarkable campaign to stop the rot.      

Cambridge Labour Party Environment Forum (CLEF); the Federation of Cambridge Residents Associations (FeCRA); Council for Protection of Rural England (CPRE) Cambridge and Peterborough; Cambridge Friends of the Earth (CamFoE); Cambridge Schools Eco Council are proud to host Feargal’s talk and to discuss water quality and its connections to the climate emergency and economic growth.

The event promises to be exciting. Your voice as citizens is important to help us protect our chalk stream and its landscapes and wildlife

TO BOOK, click on the short link to the eventbrite listing below. https://bit.ly/3nR9MUj

Give Bees a Chance! How can we help bees and feed the world?

Thursday 10th December 2020 18.30 GMT  ONLINE

A free on-line event organised by the University of Cambridge. 
Register for tickets here.

We need bees and bees need our help. The decline in pollinating insects is one of the most worrying symptoms of climate breakdown because much of our food production relies on them.  

So, what can we do? Does it help if we make our gardens more welcoming to pollinators? Can scientists breed more bee-friendly plants? What role can farmers and the food industry play? What about the government’s new Office for Environmental Protection? 

Our panel will address these questions and others from the audience, to set out the steps we can all take to give bees a better chance.

Dave Goulson is the author of several popular books about bees, including the Garden Jungle.
Lynn Dicks is a conservation scientist focused on insect conservation and biodiversity in agricultural landscapes.
Hamish Symington researches pollination and plant-pollinator interactions at the University of Cambridge.
Howard Griffiths, Co-Chair of Cambridge Global Food Security IRC, Professor of Plant Ecology, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge. 

An #AnnualFoodAgenda event, organised by the University of Cambridge, Cambridge Global Food Security IRC and CambPlants Hub, powered by EIT Food, supported by the EIT, a body of the European Union. 

Image by Sven Lachmann from Pixabay. 

Seasonal NatHistFest

As we were not able to hold its annual Conversazione and NatHistFest in April we are planning a small online Seasonal NatHistFest at 7:30 pm on 10th December 2020. This will take the form of short, 5 minute, talks, and a quiz. It will also launch the online NatHistFest on the new CNHS website.

Please email events@cnhs.org.uk if you would like to give a short talk – there will only be time for three or or four talks (by Zoom).

NatHistFest exhibits can be a set of up to six photos with captions or a poster in the form of a pdf. The subject of your display should relate to natural history but does not have to be seasonal or specifically Cambridgeshire. Each exhibit will have its own page on the website with the title of the exhibit, name of exhibitor and any other details you wish to make public. Photos and pdfs should be sent as files smaller than 5MB.

The NatHistFest will be ‘opened’ on 10th December and then remain accessible. As NatHistFest will remain open until at least the end of 2020, exhibits will continue to be added during December. Please send them to website@cnhs.org.uk as soon as they are ready so they can be added to the website, but they will not be made public until 10th December.

We look forward to seeing a great variety of displays!